2012 Elections Parliament of Georgia

The elections for the 8th Convocation of the Parliament of Georgia took place on 1 October 2012, which the Georgian Dream coalition won. It resulted in the first democratic transfer of power in Georgia, with the defeat of ruling party United National Movement of president Mikheil Saakashvili. The elections also meant the first step in the transition from a presidential to a parliamentary system.

The six party Georgian Dream bloc received 55% of the proportional vote, winning 85 out of 150 seats. Only GD and UNM managed to pass the 5% threshold and all majoritarian single mandate constituencies were won by those two parties. The turnout was 61.3%, which was 8.5% higher compared to 2008. The elections could not be held in the Russian occupied Abkhazia and South Ossetia / Tskhinvali Region, in lack of Georgian control over the regions.

 

Electoral system

As at previous elections, a mixed system was applied in which citizens cast two votes. Through a proportional party-list vote, with a 5% threshold, 77 of the 150 MPs were elected. The remaining 73 MPs were elected in single mandate majoritarian constituencies with a 30% threshold for the winner. If candidates would fair to pass the 30% bar, a second round run-off between the two best performing candidates should be scheduled within two weeks.1Civil Georgia, Elections Guide, 30 Sept 2012. In a change to the 2008 elections, independent candidates were allowed to run for parliament in single mandate constituencies. Independent candidates had to be nominated by a so called initiative group of at least five people.2Civil Georgia, 11 Seek Registration as Independent Majoritarian MP Candidate, 6 Aug 2012.

The constituencies of Akhalgori and Liakhvi (combined district for the Eredvi and Kurta municipalities) were eliminated as result of the 2008 Russian-Georgian war and the subsequent loss of Georgian control over these parts of South Ossetia/Tskhinvali. This also meant the single mandate constituencies were reduced from 75 to 73 and the proportional mandates were increased to 77.3Civil Georgia, Election Code Goes into Effect, 13 Jan 2012. The electoral district of Azhar (Upper Abkhazia) in the Kodori Valley of Abkhazia was also abolished, for the same reason as the abolition of the Liakhvi dstrict. Since Upper Abkhazia was not a single mandate constituency, this had no effect on the composition of parliament.

The election districts ranged in size from 5,800 to 163,000 registered voters,4Civil Georgia, Number of Voters Per Election District and Region, 7 Aug 2012. an imbalance that was only corrected with the 2016 elections. A total of 3,613,851 voters were registered, the highest number since 1990.5Civil Georgia, CEC Reports Largest Number of Voters in 22 Years, 6 Aug 2012. Of these, there were 43,176 voters registered abroad, out of 305,315 citizens listed as being abroad.

Single-mandate constituencies 2012 elections Georgia - registered voters (illustration Jelger Groeneveld)
Number of registered voters per single mandate constituency (illustration Jelger Groeneveld)

Also, for the first time EU citizens were able to vote, of which 116 were registered. A constitutional amendment tailored to Georgian Dream leader Bizdina Ivanishvili, who did not have a Georgian passport yet, made EU citizens eligible to vote of they resided in the previous five years in Georgia.6Civil Georgia, CEC: Number of Voters 3,613,851, 29 Sept 2012. In total 3,766 polling stations were established, including 71 for special cases, 45 abroad and two polling stations were established at Georgian military bases in Afghanistan (in Helmand and Shukvani).7CESKO, Report On The Parliamentary Elections of Georgia 2012 (pdf), Election Period until the Voting Day, page 18

Parties and candidates

In total 41 political unions applied to the Central Election Commission with a request for the right to participate in the elections.8CESKO, Report On The Parliamentary Elections of Georgia 2012 (pdf), page 27-30 Ultimately 14 parties and two election blocs were registered to participate in the elections (see Appendix 1).9Civil Georgia, Elections Guide, 30 Sept 2012. The two blocs were Georgian Dream, a coalition of six parties led by Georgian Dream-Democratic Georgia, and Christian-Democratic Union, which consisted of two parties.

The applications of 19 election subjects were refused for a variety of administrative reasons. A total of 2,757 candidates were electable, of which 783 (28%) were female. Of those, 444 candidates took part in the 73 single-mandate races, among them were 60 female and 2 independents.10OSCE-ODIHR Final Report Election Observation, 2012, page 1111Civil Georgia, List of Majoritarian MP Candidates, 20 Sept 2012. Georgian Dream and United National Movement were the only parties with candidates in all 73 constituencies.

Results

The elections were won by the Georgian Dream coalition with a proportional vote of 55.0%. The bloc obtained a total of 85 of 150 seats in parliament. Ruling United National Movement won the remaining 65 seats. Georgian Dream and the United National Movement were the only electoral subjects that managed to clear the 5% electoral threshold and win seats in parliament. Within the Georgian Dream bloc all parties gained seats: Georgian Dream party (47), Free Democrats (11), Republican party (9), Conservative Party (6), Industry Will Save Georgia (6) and National Forum (6). 

As result of the elections, UNM changed from ruling party into the sole opposition party in the new parliament, which was the first democratic change of power in Georgia since its independence.

The table below shows a summary of the official results released by the Central Election Commission CESKO, split by the proportional vote and the totals of the majoritarian district vote (more details in Appendix 1).

Party Leader Share (%) Seats
Prop. Maj. Prop. Maj. Total +/-
Georgian Dream bloc Kakha Kaladze 54.97 53.47 44 41 85 +8212The Republican Party had 2 seats and the Conservative Party had 1 seat in the previous parliament.
United National Movement David Bakradze 40.33 40.72 33 32 65 -54
Christian-Democratic Union bloc Giorgi Targamadze 2.04 2.30 0 0 0 -6
Labour Party of Georgia Shalva Natelashvili 1.24 0.94 0 0 0 -6
New Rights David Gamkrelidze 0.43 0.68 0 0 0 -17
Free Georgia Kakha Kukava 0.27 1.30 0 0 0 0
Movement For a Fair Georgia Tamar Jugeli 0.19 0.20 0 0 0 0
National-Democratic Party Bachuk Kardava 0.14 0.06 0 0 0 0
Georgian Group Jondo Baghaturia 0.11 0.19 0 0 0 0
Georgian Sportsmen’s Community Edisheri Machaidze 0.07 0.00 0 0 0 0
Freedom – the Way of Zviad Gamsakhurdia Malkhazi Gorgaslidze 0.05 0.01 0 0 0 0
Merab Kostava Society Vazha Adamia 0.05 0.03 0 0 0 0
Future Georgia Giorgi Lagidze 0.03 0.04 0 0 0 0
Labour Council of Georgia Tamaz Japoshvili 0.03 0.02 0 0 0 0
Public Movement Mamuka Khimshiashvili 0.03 0 0 0 0
People’s Party Ivane Giorgadze 0.03 0 0 0 0
Independents   0.03 0 0 0
Total 100.00 100.00 77 73 150  
em>Total cast votes 2,215,661 100.00
Registered voters and turnout 3,613,851 61.3
Sources: CESKO 13CESKO, Dashboard 2012 elections14CESKO, Report On The Parliamentary Elections of Georgia 2012 (pdf), Final results, page 60-64

Single mandate constituencies

Georgian Dream won 41 of the 73 single mandate constituencies, with UNM winning the other 32. No runoff was required as all leading candidates received 47% or more of the votes, thereby passing the 30% threshold. In all districts the main contenders were candidates of GD and UNM, with other candidates playing a marginal role.

The cities were the driver behind the political change. All single mandate constituencies of the four major cities Tbilisi, Kutaisi, Batumi and Rustavi were won by Georgian Dream candidates with a clear margin. The cities represented 38% of registered voters. UNM maintained support in Mingrelia, Samtskhe-Javakheti and Kvemo Kartli regions, winning with a large margin from GD.

 

Results of the single mandate constituencies in 2012. (illustration Jelger Groeneveld)
Winners of the single mandates with the margin to the runner-up (illustration Jelger Groeneveld).

In Sachkhere, home district of GD founder Bidzina Ivanishvili, support for GD candidate Manana Kobakhidze was near unanimous (92.7%). It was by far the highest score for GD in a district. The district also had the second highest turnout (see below). UNM secured significant wins with more than 50% margin in Kvemo Kartli and Samtskhe Javakheti regions. At the other end of the scale, the margin was less than 100 votes in Baghdati and Kharagauli districts (both in Imereti) for the winning candidates of GD.

Turnout

The national turnout was 61.1%, which was 8.5% higher than in the 2008 election. In capital Tbilisi, with nearly 30% of the electorate, the turnout was 63.4%. The turnout varied between 35% and 78% per electoral district, with both ends being outliers (see appendix 3). In half of the districts the turnout was within a 5% bandwidth from the average, representing half of the votes.

The lowest turnout by far was noted in Tsalka district (#25), while the highest turnouts were noted in Tbilisi’s Mtatsminda district (#1) and Sachkhere (#50). The latter is the hometown of Georgian Dream founder Bidzina Ivanishvili. Regionally, the turnout was significantly lower in the South of the country, specifically in Kvemo Kartli region.

Turnout per constituency (illustration Jelger Groeneveld)
Turnout per constituency (illustration Jelger Groeneveld)

Aftermath

The elections resulted in the first democratic transfer of power in independent Georgia, after having experienced a coup in 1991-1992 and a revolution in 2003. Since the term of president Saakashvili would end only in October 2013, the Georgian government had a year of so called cohabitation. Georgian Dream leader Bidzina Ivanishvili indicated during power handover talks he rather had president Saakashvili resign.15Civil Georgia, Meeting of the Rivals amid ‘Most of Power’ Handover, 7 Oct 2012 Which he didn’t.

On 25 October 2012, a new cabinet was sworn in, which was led by Prime Minister Bidzina Ivanishvili. He formed a cabinet with 20 ministers and deputy ministers. Georgian Dream had seven posts, while Free Democrats had four cabinet posts. The Republicans and National Forum each had one cabinet post. The other parties of the bloc were not represented in the cabinet and seven cabinet members were non-partisan.16Civil Georgia, Ivanishvili Confirmed as Prime Minister, 25 Oct 2012 Republican leader David Usupashvili became Speaker of Parliament.17Civil Georgia, New Parliament Speaker Elected, 21 Oct 2012

The Georgian Dream coalition eventually formed three parliamentary factions: the liberal Free Democrats and Republican Party formed their own factions of 11 and 9 MPs respectively, while the other four parties of the coalition united in the Georgian Dream faction with 65 MPs. UNM also formed three factions: a faction of 46 MPs and two factions of 7 MPs. Five other MPs from the UNM remained outside one of these factions.18Civil Georgia, Six Factions Formed in New Parliament, 21 Oct 2012

 

Appendix

1. Participating parties and electoral blocs

The complete list of all participating parties and electoral blocs with their votes in the national constituency, the sum of their votes in the single mandate constituencies and their seats in parliament. The table is ordered by the election list number under which the parties have been registered and campaigned with.

Party / Bloc and list number Proportional Vote % Majoritarian Vote % Seats +/-
1 Kakha Kukava – Free Georgia 5,865 0.27 27,850 1.30 0 0
4 National Democratic Party 3,023 0.14 1,380 0.06 0 0
5 United National Movement – More Benefit to the People 867,432 40.34 869,109 40.72 65 -54
9 Movement For a Fair Georgia 4,073 0.19 4,203 0.20 0 0
10 Giorgi Targamadze – Christian-Democratic Union (bloc)
  • Christian Democratic Movement
  • European Democrats of Georgia
43,805 2.04 49,051 2.30 0 -6
17 Public Movement 546 0.03 0 0
19 Freedom (“Tavisupleba”) – The Way of Zviad Gamsakhurdia 1,013 0.05 212 0.01 0 0
23 Jondi Baghaturia – Georgian Group (“Kartuli Dasi”) 2,324 0.11 4,127 0.19 0 0
24 New Rights 9,255 0.43 14,434 0.68 0 -17
26 People’s Party 527 0.02 0 0
30 Merab Kostava Society 997 0.05 711 0.03 0 0
35 Future Georgia 701 0.03 951 0.04 0 0
36 Labour Council of Georgia 581 0.03 409 0.02 0 0
38 Shalva Natelashvili – Labor Party of Georgia 26,621 1.24 20,105 0.94 0 -6
40 Georgian Sportsmen’s Community 1,572 0.07 64 0.00 0 0
41 Bidzina Ivanishvili – Georgian Dream1Within the coalition, the Republican Party and the Conservative Party had already seats in the previous parliament.
    • Georgian Dream – Democratic Georgia
    • Our Georgia – Free Democrats
    • Republican Party of Georgia
    • Conservative Party of Georgia
    • Industry Will Save Georgia
    • National Forum
1,181,862 54.97 1,141,404 53.47 85
47
11
9
6
6
6
+82
+47
+11
+7
+5
+6
+6
Total2This is the actual sum of the reported individual results. The CESKO reported grand total of 2,215,661 votes, minus the reported 62,874 invalid votes reveals an unreported gap of 2,590 (see below). 2,150,197 97.05     150  
Invalid ballots 62,874 2.83        
Missing ballots3There seems to be 2,590 votes missing from the equation in the CESKO reporting. 2,590 0.12        
Total cast votes 2,215,661 100.00        
Registered voters and turnout 3,613,851 61.3        
Source: CESKO Full Report 2012 elections, CESKO Summary protocol,4CESKO, Summary protocol, 2012 Registered parties5 CESKO, Registered Election Subjects, 2012
2. Elected members of Parliament

The following table lists all elected MPs as announced by the official election results of the central election commission CESKO and is a snapshot only. From the 150 members of parliament, 77 were elected through proportional representation of the national constituency with party-lists. The remaining 73 members were elected through single-mandate majoritarian constituencies.

Some candidates were electable through both the proportional list and a single-mandate constituency. If they won the majoritarian constituency they entered parliament through that mandate, even if their position on the list would give them a seat in parliament as well. Prematurely terminated mandates have been noted with a remark and their replacements have been listed in the bottom table. The MPs elected by proportional representation have been ordered in the table by their position on the party-list.

 
Party-list MPs
# MP Party Remarks
  Georgian Dream (44)
3 Alasania Irakli Free Democrats Mandate terminated on 7 November 2012: appointed as Minister of Defense.
6 Topadze Giorgi Industrialists  
8 Kiguradze Ivane    
9 Saganelidze David   Mandate terminated on 30 September 20156Civil Georgia, GD Parliamentary Majority Leader Becomes CEO of Partnership Fund, 23 September 2015
10 Garibashvili Irakli   Mandate terminated on 7 November 2012: appointed as Minister of Internal Affairs
11 Davitashvili Koba People’s Party  
12 Zhorzholiani Gia Social Democrats for the Development of Georgia  
13 Gachechiladze Giorgi Green Party  
14 Panjikidze Maia   Mandate terminated on 7 November 2012: appointed as Minister of Foreign Affairs
15 Berdzenishvili David Republican Party  
16 Khaduri Nodar   Mandate terminated on 7 November 2012: appointed as Deputy Minister of Finance
17 Goguadze Nino Free Democrats  
18 Khvedelidze Gela   Mandate terminated on 7 November 2012: appointed as Deputy Minister of Internal Affairs
19 Khechinashvili Giorgi National Forum  
20 Japaridze Tedo    
21 Tkemaladze Zurab Industrialists  
22 Subari Sozar   Mandate terminated on 7 November 2012: appointed as Minister of Corrections and Legal Assistance
23 Bukia Giga Conservative Party  
24 Natsvlishvili Lasha   Mandate terminated on 7 November 2012: appointed as First Deputy Minister of Internal Affairs
25 Chikovani Irakli Free Democrats  
26 Imerlishvili Irine   Mandate terminated on 27 November 2013: appointed as secretary of National Security Council7Civil Georgia, New Secretary of NSC Appointed, 21 November 2013
27 Agulashvili Gigla Republican Party Mandate terminated on 8 May 2015: appointed as Minister of Environment and Natural Resources Protection8Civil Georgia, Reshuffled Cabinet Wins Confidence Vote, 9 May 2015
28 Berdzenishvili Levan Republican Party  
29 Zhvania Goglan    
30 Mirotadze Ani National Forum  
31 Magradze Guguli    
32 Kacheishvili Tamaz Industrialists  
33 Volski Giorgi    
34 Gujabidze Bidzina Conservative Party  
35 Avdaliani Tamaz   Mandate terminated on 31 January 2015. Avdaliani died on 30 January 2015 as result of an illness.9Parliament of  Georgia, Funeral of Tamaz Avdaliani Today, 3 February 2015
36 Mamedov Ali    
37 Petriashvili Aleksi Free Democrats Mandate terminated on 7 November 2012: appointed as State Minister
38 Pogosyan Ruslan    
39 Kiknavelidze Shalva National Forum  
40 Kopaliani Karlo    
41 Basheleishvili Demur Industrialists  
42 Keinishvili Nana    
43 Kachakhidze Merab Conservative Party  
46 Odisharia Mariani   Mandate terminated on 7 November 2012: appointed as Minister of Culture and Monuments Protection
48 Sesiashvili Irakli    
53 Kvizhinadze Paata Conservative Party  
54 Baratashvili Paata Non-party  
58 Zakareishvili Paata Republican Party Mandate terminated on 7 November 2012: appointed as State Minister for Reconciliation and Civic Equality.
62 Maisuradze Temuri National Forum  
 
  United National Movement (33)
1 Bakradze David    
2 Tsiskarishvili Petre    
3 Baramidze Giorgi    
4 Bokuchava Tinatin Non-partisan  
5 Tevdoradze Giorgi    
6 Taktakishvili Chiora    
7 Machavariani Mikheil    
8 Vashadze Giorgi    
9 Sakvarelidze David   Mandate terminated on 4 March 2015, after becoming deputy prosecutor general in Ukraine10Civil Georgia, By-Election after Death of UNM MP to Be held in Martvili in October, 18 March 2015
10 Sajaia Mariam Non-partisan  
11 Gabashvili Giorgi    
12 Japaridze Zurab Non-partisan  
13 Ratiani Sergo Non-partisan  
14 Ochiauri Giorgi Non-partisan Mandate terminated on 18 March 2015, for health reasons11Civil Georgia, By-Election after Death of UNM MP to Be held in Martvili in October, 18 March 2015
15 Kipshidze Nikolozi Non-partisan  
16 Nadirashvili Irma    
17 Tsereteli Giorgi    
18 Kublashvili Pavle    
19 Karbelashvili Giorgi    
20 Nikolaishvili Ramaz Non-partisan  
21 Melikishvili Zurab    
22 Bezhashvili Levan    
24 Targamadze Giorgi    
25 Gogorishvili Khatuna    
26 Makharadze Mikheil    
27 Meladze Giorgi    
28 Subeliani Koba    
30 Minashvili Akaki    
31 Tsiklauri Nugzar    
32 Khachidze Giorgi    
33 Darchiashvili David    
34 Kandelaki Giorgi    
35 Malashkhia Shota Non-partisan  
Single-mandate constituencies
# MP Party District Remarks
1 Papuashvili Zaza GD Mtatsminda  
2 Shavgulidze Shalva GD Vake  
3 Usupashvili David GD Republican Party Saburtalo  
4 Khabareli Shota GD Krtsanisi  
5 Kantaria Alexandre GD Isani  
6 Abashidze Zurab GD Samgori  
7 Dolidze Viktor GD Chugureti  
8 Khmaladze Vakhtang GD Didube  
9 Tsulukiani Tea GD Nadzaladevi Mandate terminated on 7 November 2012: appointed as Minister of Justice
10 Jachvliani Ioseb GD Gldani  
11 Khidasheli Tinatin GD Republican Party Sagarejo Mandate terminated on 8 May 2015: appointed as Minister of Defense12Civil Georgia, Reshuffled Cabinet Wins Confidence Vote, 9 May 2015
12 Gviniashvili Giorgi UNM Gurjaani  
13 Gelashvili Gela GD Sighnaghi  
14 Kedelashvili Zaza UNM Dedoplistskaro  
15 Gozalishvili Giorgi UNM Lagodekhi  
16 Verulashvili Marika UNM Kvareli  
17 Samkharauli Gela GD Telavi  
18 Zviadauri Zurab GD Akhmeta  
19 Kutsnashvili Zakaria GD Tianeti  
20 Dzidziguri Zviad GD Conservative Party Rustavi  
21 Peikrishvili Giorgi UNM Gardabani  
22 Suleimanov Azer UNM Marneuli  
23 Nakophia Koba UNM Bolnisi  
24 Okriashvili Kakhaber UNM Dmanisi  
25 Shavlokhashvili Revaz UNM Tsalka  
26 Bezhuashvili David UNM Tetritskaro  
27 Khundadze Dimitri GD Mtskheta  
28 Tripolski Erekle GD Dusheti  
29 Tsiklauri Mirian GD Kazbegi  
30 Onoprishvili David GD Kaspi  
32 Vakhtangashvili Malkhaz GD Gori  
33 Khabelov Leri GD Kareli  
35 Gelashvili Valeri GD Khashuri  
36 Popkhadze Gedevan GD Borjomi  
37 Chitashvili Vazha UNM Akhaltsikhe  
38 Chilingarashvili Zurab UNM Adigeni  
39 Londaridze Tariel UNM Aspindza  
40 Petrosyan Samvel UNM Akhalkalaki  
41 Mkoyan Enzel UNM Ninotsminda  
43 Japaridze Tamaz GD Oni  
44 Enukidze Gocha UNM Ambrolauri  
45 Khabuliani Sergo UNM Tsageri  
46 Liparteliani Gogi UNM Lentekhi  
47 Japaridze Viktor GD Mestia  
48 Ebanoidze Nodar GD Kharagauli  
49 Butskhridze Kakha UNM Terjola  
50 Kobakhidze Manana GD Sachkhere  
51 Kavtaradze Giorgi GD Zestafoni  
52 Kbilashvili Archil GD Baghdadi Mandate terminated on 7 November 2012: appointed as chief prosecutor
53 Lezhava Paata UNM Vani  
54 Kaladze Kakha GD Samtredia Mandate terminated on 7 November 2012: appointed as Minister of Energy and deputy Prime Minister
55 Chavchanidze David UNM Khoni  
56 Tsereteli Malkhaz GD Chiatura  
57 Chapidze Eliso GD Tkibuli  
58 Bobokhidze Akaki UNM Tskaltubo  
59 Sanikidze Gubaz GD National Forum Kutaisi  
60 Kvachantiradze Zviad GD Ozurgeti  
61 Chkhaidze Teimuraz GD Lanchkhuti  
62 Chkuaseli Teimuraz GD Chokhatauri  
63 Dartsmelidze David UNM Abasha  
64 Misabishvili Guram UNM Senaki  
65 Janashia Nauli UNM Martvili Mandate terminated on 18 March 2015; Janashia died on 17 March 2015 after a long illness.13Civil Georgia, By-Election after Death of UNM MP to Be held in Martvili in October, 18 March 2015
66 Bukia Goderdzi UNM Khobi  
67 Akhalaia Roland UNM Zugdidi  
68 Kardava Levan UNM Tsalenjikha  
69 Lemonjava Vakhtang UNM Chkhorotsku  
70 Beselia Eka GD Poti  
79 Dumbadze Murman GD Batumi  
80 Shervashidze Iasha UNM Keda  
81 Khalvashi Pati GD Kobuleti  
82 Megrelidze Omar UNM Shuakhevi  
83 Khalvashi Rostom GD Khelvachauri  
84 Bolkvadze Anzor UNM Khulo  
Sources: CESKO, Final Report Parliamentary elections 2012,14Report On The Parliamentary Elections of Georgia 2012 (pdf), Final results page 60-64 Parliament website.15Parliament of Georgia, members of the 8th Convocation
Members of Parliament that were appointed at a later stage during the 8th Convocation due to early terminations of mandates. In those cases it concerned majoritarian mandates, by-elections took place in those constituencies (bottom part of the table). The # column refers to the number on the party-list. For the majoritarian MPs it refers to the district number.
Party-list MPs
# MP Party Remarks
  Georgian Dream
45 Tsagareishvili Giorgi GD Free Democrats From 13 November 2012, replacing Irakli Alasania16Civil Georgia, Parliament Endorses Credentials of Ten New MPs, 13 November 2012.
56 Darzievi Makhir   From 13 November 2012, replacing Irakli Garibashvili
60 Shioshvili Tamaz   From 13 November 2012, replacing Maja Panjikidze
61 Shioshvili Tamaz   From 13 November 2012, replacing Nodar Khaduri
63 Tamazashvili Alexander   From 13 November 2012, replacing Gela Khvedelidze
67 Khubuluri Tengiz   From 13 November 2012, replacing Sozar Subari
69 Chrdileli Otar   From 13 November 2012, replacing Lasha Natsvlishvili
71 Lortkipanadze Dato   From 13 November 2012, replacing Aleksi Petriashvili
73 Nishnianidze Omar   From 13 November 2012, replacing Mariani Odisharia
78 Sakvarelidze Fridon GD Republican Party From 13 November 2012, replacing Paata Zakareishvili
89 Chkhetiani Darejan   From 13 December 2013, replacing Irene Imerlishvili
90 Kurtanidze Eldar   From 18 February 2015, replacing Tamaz Avdaliani
93 Nergadze Teimuraz GD Republican Party From 27 May 2015, replacing Gigla Agulashvili
107 Achba Vladimer   From 17 October 2015, replacing David Saganelidze
  United National Movement 
36 Serekeulidze Ekaterine   From 18 March 2015, replacing David Sakvarelidze
37 Tarkhnishvili Levan   From 1 April 2015, replacing Giorgi Ochiauri
Single-mandate constituencies
# MP Party District Remarks
9 Kordzaia Tamar GD Nadzaladevi From 17 May 2013 after by-election, replacing Tea Tsulukiani17Civil Georgia, Three New MPs Join Parliament, 20 May 2013; Switched to Republican Party in May 201518Civil Georgia, MP Switches Parliament Factions in Favor of Republicans, 13 May 2013
52 Kiknavelidze Paata GD Industrialist Party Baghdadi From 17 May 2013 after by-election, replacing Archil Kbilashvili; Of the Industrialist Party;19Civil Georgia, New Parliamentary Faction Established, 29 May 2013.
54 Kakhiani Giorgi GD Industrialist Party Samtredia From 17 May 2013 after by-election, replacing Kakha Kaladze; Of the Industrialist Party;
65 Daniela Soso GD Martvili From 25 November 2015 after by-electionon 1 November 2015, replacing Nauli Janashia;20Civil Georgia, MP By-Elections Early Results: Tight Race in Sagarejo, GD in Lead in Martvili, 1 November 2015
11 Khidasheli Tamar GD Republican Party Sagarejo From 25 November 2015 after by-election on 1 November 2015, replacing Tinatin Khidasheli;
3. Single-mandate constituencies

The electoral districts with number of registered voters, actual votes and the turnout. Tbilisi was divided in 10 districts.

The 73 single-mandate constituencies in the 2012 elections (illustration Jelger Groeneveld)
The 73 single-mandate constituencies in the 2012 elections (illustration Jelger Groeneveld)
# District Voters Votes Turnout Valid
Prop.
Valid
Maj.
1 Tbilisi – Mtatsminda 52,370 40,727 77.8%    
2 Tbilisi – Vake 99,241 72,637 73.2%    
3 Tbilisi – Saburtalo 128,545 92,184 71.7%    
4 Tbilisi – Krtsanisi 47,039 27,341 58.1%    
5 Tbilisi – Isani 117,804 65,159 55.3%    
6 Tbilisi – Samgori 154,621 88,906 57.5%    
7 Tbilisi – Chugureti 58,807 37,524 63.8%    
8 Tbilisi – Didube 71,663 50,194 70.0%    
9 Tbilisi – Nadzaladevi 140,467 87,131 62.0%    
10 Tbilisi – Gldani 154,898 89,280 57.6%    
11 Sagarejo 45,774 24,954 54.5%    
12 Gurjaani 55,334 37,344 67.5%    
13 Sighnaghi 31,767 21,476 67.6%    
14 Dedoplistskaro 23,131 14,334 62.0%    
15 Lagodekhi 39,808 23,912 60.1%    
16 Kvareli 29,623 20,473 69.1%    
17 Telavi 57,940 35,473 61.2%    
18 Akhmeta 30,822 18,493 60.0%    
19 Tianeti 11,157 7,593 68.1%    
20 Rustavi 110,544 66,492 60.1%    
21 Gardabani 74,268 39,234 52.8%    
22 Marneuli 98,762 43,847 44.4%    
23 Bolnisi 57,971 28,213 48.7%    
24 Dmanisi 22,927 12,254 53.4%    
25 Tsalka 24,357 8,545 35.1%    
26 Tetritskaro 22,055 11,992 54.4%    
27 Mtskheta 44,402 30,131 67.9%    
28 Dusheti 26,458 16,687 63.1%    
29 Kazbegi 5,810 3,490 60.1%    
30 Kaspi 40,367 24,641 61.0%    
32 Gori 112,291 71,787 63.9%    
33 Kareli 37,572 23,049 61.3%    
35 Khashuri 50,323 25,883 51.4%    
36 Borjomi 27,567 18,022 65.4%    
37 Akhaltsikhe 36,407 23,048 63.3%  
38 Adigeni 15,675 11,008 70.2%    
39 Aspindza 9,910 7,325 73.9%    
40 Akhalkalaki 40,814 22,328 54.7%    
41 Ninotsminda 22,811 13,708 60.1%    
43 Oni 6,885 4,686 68.1%    
44 Ambrolauri 12,111 8,950 73.9%    
45 Tsageri 11,962 8,369 70.0%    
46 Lentekhi 5,988 4,075 68.1%    
47 Mestia 8,469 5,889 69.5%    
48 Kharagauli 20,328 15,229 74.9%    
49 Terjola 34,711 24,444 70.4%    
50 Sachkhere 44,184 34,160 77.3%    
51 Zestafoni 57,050 38,127 66.8%    
52 Baghdadi 23,360 14,889 63.7%    
53 Vani 26,818 17,404 64.9%    
54 Samtredia 48,362 31,932 66.0%    
55 Khoni 24,231 16,285 67.2%    
56 Chiatura 45,226 29,724 65.7%    
57 Tkibuli 23,841 14,937 62.7%    
58 Tskaltubo 53,323 31,250 58.6%    
59 Kutaisi 162,732 90,752 55.8%    
60 Ozurgeti 64,365 43,293 67.3%    
61 Lanchkhuti 30,130 22,125 73.4%    
62 Chokhatauri 18,809 13,641 72.5%    
63 Abasha 22,024 14,612 66.3%    
64 Senaki 42,710 25,504 59.7%    
65 Martvili 34,558 20,675 59.8%    
66 Khobi 29,422 18,643 63.4%    
67 Zugdidi 128,470 60,599 47.2%    
68 Tsalenjikha 32,058 16,810 52.4%    
69 Chkhorotsku 23,127 14,902 64.4%    
70 Poti 41,565 24,648 59.3%    
79 Batumi 133,951 80,405 60.0%    
80 Keda 15,751 11,273 71.6%    
81 Kobuleti 69,239 40,071 57.9%    
82 Shuakhevi 15,157 9,791 64.6%    
83 Khelvachauri 46,597 28,076 60.3%    
84 Khulo 24,235 14,696 60.6%    
87 Abroad 43,176 7,815 18.1%    
Total21This is the actual sum of the registered voters and submitted votes per constituency. CESKO reported a grand total of 2,215,661 votes, including a total of 7,815 votes abroad, which leaves a gap of 161 votes. 3,613,851 2,207,685 61.1%    

Sources: CESKO22CESKO, Dashboard 2012 elections23CESKO, Summary protocol of the results of the elections of the Parliament of Georgia on October 1, 2012 (pdf)24CESKO, Total number of voters according to electoral districts (pdf)

References and footnotes

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